Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G.   Childhood Brainstem Cancer Awareness                     
© All rights reserved Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. 2016                 Privacy/Disclaimer. 
Website designed by INM

Tumour Banking

Research Research Clinical Trials Clinical Trials DIPG Organizations DIPG Organizations Tumour Banks Tumour Banks Alternate Treatments Alternate Treatments

Tumour Banking

D.I.P.G. researchers have had limited access to D.I.P.G. tumour samples until fairly recently. Left over cells from biopsies and tumour specimens donated after the child has passed are stored at tumour banks for clinical research. An awful reality for families and researchers alike. “Collecting and Banking Pediatric Brain Tumour Research Specimens” is a trial found at www.canadiancancertrials.ca where several Canadian banking options are available. Bio-Banking Bio-banking is described as “the practice of creating large-scale repositories of human biological material (ex. blood, urine, tissue samples, DNA, etc.) designed to further medical research.” For more detailed information: Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada: Brain Tumour Tissue Bank DIPG Registry: Role for Biopsy Biobank Resource Centre Bio-Banking and DIPG “Without biopsies, there weren’t any DIPG tissue samples to study. Clinicians tried to make do with another cancer, adult glioblastoma multiforme. That brain tumor strikes adults and is thought to be similar to DIPG because the two tumors seem to resemble each other under an optical microscope.  Any clinical trial to test potential therapies for DIPG was based on what was known about adult glioblastoma. “We’ve done that now for 30 to 40 years and unfortunately made no progress in the disease whatsoever,” states Kieran. FULL ARTICLE
It wasn’t until 2012 that two groups of researchers in the United States used autopsy samples of pediatric brain tumours to do research. In contrast, French neurosurgeons successfully biopsied 24 DIPG tumours in 2007 for research purposes. It is shocking that it is only in the past 5 years that true D.I.P.G. tumour samples have been used in research. Researchers have a lot of catching up to do in D.I.P.G. research and they cannot do that without adequate research funding.
Thank You to all the parents/guardians that have selflessly made organ donations and donated biopsy samples and D.I.P.G. tumours. Your generosity will play a fundamental role in helping researchers find a cure for D.I.P.G.
Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. Childhood Brainstem Cancer Awareness
               © All rights reserved Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. 2016

D.I.P.G Tumour

Banking

Tumour Banking

D.I.P.G. researchers have had limited access to D.I.P.G. tumour samples until fairly recently. Left over cells from biopsies and tumour specimens donated after the child has passed are stored at tumour banks for clinical research. An awful reality for families and researchers alike. “Collecting and Banking Pediatric Brain Tumour Research Specimens” is a trial found at www.canadiancancertrials.ca  where several Canadian banking options are available. Bio-Banking Bio-banking is described as “the practice of creating large-scale repositories of human biological material (ex. blood, urine, tissue samples, DNA, etc.) designed to further medical research.” For more detailed information: Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada: Brain Tumour Tissue Bank DIPG Registry: Role for Biopsy Biobank Resource Centre Bio-Banking and DIPG “Without biopsies, there weren’t any DIPG tissue samples to study. Clinicians tried to make do with another cancer, adult glioblastoma multiforme. That brain tumor strikes adults and is thought to be similar to DIPG because the two tumors seem to resemble each other under an optical microscope.  Any clinical trial to test potential therapies for DIPG was based on what was known about adult glioblastoma. “We’ve done that now for 30 to 40 years and unfortunately made no progress in the disease whatsoever,” states Kieran. FULL ARTICLE
It wasn’t until 2012 that two groups of researchers in the United States used autopsy samples of pediatric brain tumours to do research. In contrast, French neurosurgeons successfully biopsied 24 DIPG tumours in 2007 for research purposes. It is shocking that it is only in the past 5 years that true D.I.P.G. tumour samples have been used in research. Researchers have a lot of catching up to do in D.I.P.G. research and they cannot do that without adequate research funding.
Thank You to all the parents/guardians that have selflessly made organ donations and donated biopsy samples and D.I.P.G. tumours. Your generosity will play a fundamental role in helping researchers find a cure for D.I.P.G.