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         Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G.   Childhood Brainstem Cancer Awareness                     
Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. has started the Protect Your Peepers Campaign to encourage parents to seek quality, comprehensive eye care for their young children. Brain Cancer is now the leading cause of childhood cancer deaths. D.I.P.G. tumours account for 80% of these deaths. Protect Your Peepers is a children’s health initiative aimed at encouraging families to seek quality eye care for their young children in the hopes of detecting pediatric brain tumours, such as D.I.P.G., sooner.
Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada supported our Protect Your Peepers Campaign for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this past September 2016!
Did You Know? Only 14% of children under 6 years of age receive professional eye care Nearly 25% of school age children have vision problems
Comprehensive Eye Care for Children A Comprehensive Eye Exam conducted by a qualified Optometrist is a non-invasive method to detect ocular symptoms of health and sight issues. The goal of this initiative is earlier detection of pediatric brain tumours, such as DIPG, in young children. However, it comes with the benefit of maintaining good overall eye health for your child.
Our goals are to: Increase the number of young children receiving professional eye care Detect childhood brain tumours earlier Raise awareness amongst Optometrists about D.I.P.G. tumour symptoms Educate families on the many health and developmental benefits or regular, quality eye care Collect eye health data for childhood cancer researchers studying D.I.P.G. tumours
Did You Know? A qualified Optometrist can detect… Aneurysms Autoimmune Disorders Brain Tumours Diabetes Eye Diseases High Blood Pressure Liver Disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Neurological/Brain Disorders Parkinson’s Disease Sickle Cell Disease Thyroid Disease
Ensure Your Child Receives a Quality Eye Exam 1) Do your homework Check the Optometrist’s qualifications Check the clinic’s reviews Check what information the clinic provides on their website You can also use the doctor locator from the BC Doctors of Optometry website to find an optometrist in your area. 2) Ask questions Ask what a comprehensive pediatric eye exam includes at their clinic and compare it to our list below Ask ahead of time if pressure testing or other brain tumour detection tests are available for young children Young children do not need to know how to read to have an eye exam. The Optometrist will use the Tumbling E chart or Lea Symbol system (shapes) for the exam. 
Comprehensive Eye Exams A quality eye exam looks at the entire eye health and the visual system. It will often include: Case history (child’s birth, medical & family history) Visual acuity measurement Evaluation of ocular mobility, binocular vision, and accomodative function Ocular health examination Assessment of refractive status Supplemental testing of visual perceptual development when appropriate Eye pressure testing ** **Parents may need to request
Not All Eye Exams Are Comprehensive Exams It is important for parents to understand that vision screenings conducted at school and vision evaluations provided by the child’s doctor are NOT comprehensive eye exams and do not adequately assess a child’s overall eye health and visual abilities. “All Children should receive a comprehensive eye and vision examination assessing and treating any deficiencies in ocular health…” -Canadian Association of Optometrists
Optimal Eye Exam Schedule for Good Health
Infants and Toddlers (Birth to 24 months) Preschool Children (2-5 years) Kindergarten (5-6 years) School Age Children (6-18 years)
By 6-9 months your child should have their first eye exam Around 3 years: your child should undergo at least one eye exam between 2 and 5 years of age Before entering Kindergarten, your child should have an eye exam to ensure the following are functioning at an optimal level for learning: near vision distance vision binocular coordination eye movement skills focusing skills peripheral awareness hand-eye coordination School age children should have annual eye exams to ensure good eyesight and overall health
Warning Signs Book a comprehensive eye exam if your child is struggling with any of the following symptoms: red, itchy or watering eyes sensitivity to light an eye that consistently turns in or out tilting their head to see better squinting, rubbing the eyes, or excessive blinking a lack of concentration covering or closing one eye irritability or short attention span holding objects too close avoiding activities that require near vision, such as reading or coloring, or distance vision, such as playing ball or tag visible frustration or grimacing complaining of headaches or tired eyes
How does this campaign benefit D.I.P.G. Brain Tumour Research? The ocular motor system is located in the brainstem (pons and midbrain) where D.I.P.G. tumours grow throughout the supportive tissues of the pons. Ocular nerve problems are common with brainstem gliomas which is why accute strabismus is often the first indications of a pediatric D.I.P.G. tumour. Optometrists making careful observations of CN III, IV and VI, and the optic nerve during pediatric eye exams could potentially see subtle changes or warning signs of a developing D.I.P.G. tumour. There have been no efforts, thus far, at earlier detection of D.I.P.G. due to its 0% survival rate and lack of treatment options. However, as the Optometry community takes a more active role in the early detection of D.I.P.G. tumours and more young children receive professional eye care, we can: Collect data through annual eye exams and provide researchers with new insights into the eitiology of D.I.P.G. brain tumours Observe the subtle changes in eye health that may be associated with a D.I.P.G. diagnosis before it is in aggressive progression Develop early screening protocols Detect D.I.P.G. sooner and give children more time to seek treatment
“A comprehensive eye exam…can often be the first line of detection of a brain tumour.” -Dr. Lee, DO, BSc
Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. Childhood Brainstem Cancer Awareness
               © All rights reserved Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. 2016
Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada supported our Protect Your Peepers Campaign for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this past September 2016!
Monkey Crew Against D.I.P.G. has started the Protect Your Peepers Campaign to encourage parents to seek quality, comprehensive eye care for their young children. Brain Cancer is now the leading cause of childhood cancer deaths. D.I.P.G. tumours account for 80% of these deaths. Protect Your Peepers is a children’s health initiative aimed at encouraging families to seek quality eye care for their young children in the hopes of detecting pediatric brain tumours, such as D.I.P.G., sooner. Our goals are to: Increase the number of young children receiving professional eye care Detect childhood brain tumours earlier Raise awareness amongst Optometrists about D.I.P.G. tumour symptoms Educate families on the many health and developmental benefits or regular, quality eye care Collect eye health data for childhood cancer researchers studying D.I.P.G. tumours
Did You Know? A qualified Optometrist can detect… Aneurysms Autoimmune Disorders Brain Tumours Diabetes Eye Diseases High Blood Pressure Liver Disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Neurological/Brain Disorders Parkinson’s Disease Sickle Cell Disease Thyroid Disease
Comprehensive Eye Care for Children A Comprehensive Eye Exam conducted by a qualified Optometrist is a non-invasive method to detect ocular symptoms of health and sight issues. The goal of this initiative is earlier detection of pediatric brain tumours, such as DIPG, in young children. However, it comes with the benefit of maintaining good overall eye health for your child. Ensure Your Child Receives a Quality Eye Exam 1) Do your homework Check the Optometrist’s qualifications Check the clinic’s reviews Check what information the clinic provides on their website You can also use the doctor locator from the BC Doctors of Optometry website to find an optometrist in your area. 2) Ask questions Ask what a comprehensive pediatric eye exam includes at their clinic and compare it to our list below Ask ahead of time if pressure testing or other brain tumour detection tests are available for young children Young children do not need to know how to read to have an eye exam. The Optometrist will use the Tumbling E chart or Lea Symbol system (shapes) for the exam. 
Comprehensive Eye Exams A quality eye exam looks at the entire eye health and the visual system. It will often include: Case history (child’s birth, medical & family history) Visual acuity measurement Evaluation of ocular mobility, binocular vision, and accomodative function Ocular health examination Assessment of refractive status Supplemental testing of visual perceptual development when appropriate Eye pressure testing ** **Parents may need to request
Not All Eye Exams Are Comprehensive Exams It is important for parents to understand that vision screenings conducted at school and vision evaluations provided by the child’s doctor are  NOT comprehensive eye exams and do not adequately assess a child’s overall eye health and visual abilities. “All Children should receive a comprehensive eye and vision examination assessing and treating any deficiencies in ocular health…” -Canadian Association of Optometrists
Did You Know? Only 14% of children under 6 years of age receive professional eye care Nearly 25% of school age children have vision problems
Optimal Eye Exam Schedule for Good Health: Infants and Toddlers (Birth to 24 months) By 6-9 months your child should have their first eye exam Preschool Children (2-5 years) Around 3 years: your child should undergo at least one eye exam between 2 and 5 years of age Kindergarten (5-6 years) Before entering Kindergarten, your child should have an eye exam to ensure the following are functioning at an optimal level for learning: near vision distance vision binocular coordination eye movement skills focusing skills peripheral awareness hand-eye coordination School Age Children (6-18 years) School age children should have annual eye exams to ensure good eyesight and overall health
Warning Signs Book a comprehensive eye exam if your child is struggling with any of the following symptoms: red, itchy or watering eyes sensitivity to light an eye that consistently turns in or out tilting their head to see better squinting, rubbing the eyes, or excessive blinking a lack of concentration covering or closing one eye irritability or short attention span holding objects too close avoiding activities that require near vision, such as reading or coloring, or distance vision, such as playing ball or tag visible frustration or grimacing complaining of headaches or tired eyes
How does this campaign benefit D.I.P.G. Brain Tumour Research? The ocular motor system is located in the brainstem (pons and midbrain) where D.I.P.G. tumours grow throughout the supportive tissues of the pons. Ocular nerve problems are common with brainstem gliomas which is why accute strabismus is often the first indications of a pediatric D.I.P.G. tumour. Optometrists making careful observations of CN III, IV and VI, and the optic nerve during pediatric eye exams could potentially see subtle changes or warning signs of a developing D.I.P.G. tumour. There have been no efforts, thus far, at earlier detection of D.I.P.G. due to its 0% survival rate and lack of treatment options. However, as the Optometry community takes a more active role in the early detection of D.I.P.G. tumours and more young children receive professional eye care, we can: Collect data through annual eye exams and provide researchers with new insights into the eitiology of D.I.P.G. brain tumours Observe the subtle changes in eye health that may be associated with a D.I.P.G. diagnosis before it is in aggressive progression Develop early screening protocols Detect D.I.P.G. sooner and give children more time to seek treatment
“A comprehensive eye exam…can often be the first line of detection of a brain tumour.” -Dr. Lee, DO, BSc